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22 Ways Your Office Job Is Destroying Your Body

Sleeping at deskPeter Macdiarmid/Getty ImagesYour office job is killing you.

Traditional office jobs may seem “safe” compared to more labour-intensive, blue-collar professions. But it turns out the long hours, stress of tight deadlines, and sedentary nature of office jobs, among other things, can be detrimental to your physical and mental well-being — and they can literally suck the life out of you.

Anything from the office printer to your computer keyboard can have serious effects on your body and health.

This is an update of an article written by Vivian Giang and Kim Bhasin.

Using a treadmill desk increases your chances of physically hurting yourself.

Some office workers are using treadmill desks as a way to avoid shaving years off their life -- but while these machines may help reduce your risk of obesity and heart disease, using them may make you more prone to increased typos and can cause you to fall (and hurt yourself) more often than merely sitting in a chair.

Spending too much time with a hot device on your lap lowers sperm count.

If you use a laptop on your lap instead of a desk, you can experience skin problems from the heat, and there's even more concerning news for men. New York University researchers found that laptops can raise the temperature of the scrotum, which could lower a man's sperm count.

Working for more than 10 hours per day may lead to a heart attack.

European researchers found that people who work 10 hours or more every day have a 60% greater risk of a multitude of cardiovascular problems, including heart attack and angina.

Endlessly staring at a computer screen harms your vision.

Even though computer screens don't give off radiation, the strain from staring over long periods of time can cause harm to your vision, though many effects are temporary. Beyond that, you can also experience headaches and migraines.

Extreme boredom may make your more likely to die from heart disease or stroke.

Boredom can actually shorten your life, according to researchers. A study from University College London showed that those who complain of boredom are more likely to die young, and those who report high levels of tedium are much more likely to die from heart disease or stroke. It also puts you at higher risk for workplace accidents.

Dirty keyboards are as dangerous as E. coli and coliforms.

Keyboards can be a breeding ground for bacteria if not kept clean. Microbiologists found that keyboards can even have up to five times as many bacteria as a bathroom, and can include dangerous ones like E. coli and coliforms -- both commonly associated with food poisoning -- along with staphylococcus, which causes a range of infections.

Germs are everywhere in the office.

Your keyboard isn't the only bacteria farm in the office. Door and faucet knobs, the office microwave, elevator and printer buttons, handshakes, etc., are all hot spots for bacteria. Microbes are everywhere, and some can even kill you.

Typing too much leads to carpal tunnel syndrome.

An excessive amount of typing is a well-known cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), which is a painful wrist strain that can go up your arm. CTS can get bad enough to cause permanent nerve damage and muscle wasting.

Tight deadlines negatively affect your learning and memory.

You get stressed out when you have to meet a strict deadline, which can affect your learning and memory according to Science Daily. This sort of short-term stress can be just as bad as stress that lasts weeks or months.

Uncomfortable shoes may eventually lead to spinal injuries, muscle spasms, and chronic headaches.

Those pumps you're wearing might make you feel tall and confident, but they're also harming your body in surprising ways.

Between 2005 and 2009, women's visits to doctors for their feet increased by 75%, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

Wearing uncomfortable shoes can lead to spinal injuries, muscle spasms, and even chronic headaches and migraines. Furthermore, the more pain you feel, the more likely you'll sit for longer periods, which leads to a slew of health problems on its own.

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