'Yes, But REAL Capitalism Hasn't Been Tried'

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If you’ve ever had the fortune of idly debating economic systems with a Marxist or a real, honest-to-god communist, you probably had the part of the conversation where you point out all the failures of communism (Russia, Cuba, Angola, etc.) and they respond with: “Yes, but, those weren’t real communist systems, those were bastardizations of the ideal.”

That’s kind of a tough line to refute — cause how can it be disproved — except that if every time we mortal humans try communism it utterly fails, what different does it make if some perfect, non-human aliens can make it work?

It turns out, the tables have turned, and it’s the self-proclaimed free market economies that are in the death spiral, done in by their own excesses.

Of course, this can’t be an indictment of capitalism. Cause after all, America doesn’t have real capitalism.

No, see, we don’t have capitalism, we have corporatism (aha!). Or they say, how can you call our system capitalist, when we have a Federal Reserve, which sets the price of money. Or, how can you call it capitalism when the financial sector has thoroughly captured the public sector.

Once again, it’s the same non-disprovable line of logic that your communist friend used on you in college, and it’s no more valid.

Fine, we have a fed, and we have a system whereby corporations can more effectively capture the government than non-organised individuals (duh), but look, the American experiment is pretty much as good as it gets (pace Medieval Iceland). So if you don’t think that the American form of capitalism can work, it hardly does any good to suggest that somewhere, some eunuchs could practice it better.

Maybe, just maybe, no system that humans are capable of designing or living in is crash proof. On paper, with aliens, yes, maybe you could design one.

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