This elevated park is one of Yelp's top recommendations for NYC tourists

Manhattan’s High Line park is officially a “must-see” attraction for those visiting the Big Apple, according to Yelp.

The elevated railway was active until 1980, then converted into a park in 2009. Now tourists and locals alike can enjoy views of the Hudson River as they walk along 30 blocks above the neighbourhood of Chelsea.

Today, with over 1800 reviews and an average of 4.5 stars the High Line sits at the very top of Yelp’s “local flavour” category. This section is where curious sightseers can find “the wackier listings that make any city unique.”

But “wacky” doesn’t even begin to cover the elaborate park design, nor does it convey how special this modern addition is to New York City.

We gave readers a look inside the park back in 2013, but scroll down to take an updated tour of the beloved High Line.

The High Line starts on West 34th Street. Recent subway extensions have made access to this park of town much easier. The 34th street entrance is a ramp, so it's wheelchair and stroller friendly.

The High Line Park

There are five elevator entrances spaced throughout the park as well. On an early November morning, we decided to start at the top and work our way south to 14th Street.

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Source: Friends of the High Line

The park was nearly empty at 7:30 a.m. -- a rare sight. We should mention no dogs are allowed on the High Line, so it's probably not a place morning people and their canine friends visit very often.

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The park opens at 7:00 a.m. Aside from joggers, I spotted friends having coffee and the occasional commuter taking a scenic route to work.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

This section of the High Line 'features a simple path through the existing self-seeded plantings.' These plants grew naturally in the years after the train's closure.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

'Our strategy of 'agri-tecture' combines organic and building materials into a blend of changing proportions that accommodates the wild, the cultivated, the intimate, and the social.'

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Source: Friends of the High Line

You can stop and look out onto the industrial streets of New York City.

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Parts of the park path are paved around the railways. You can see the original turn-switch for the train in this gap under the fence.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

When you think 'park,' towering construction cranes and steel beams probably don't come to mind. But the High Line isn't your average park.

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Elevated above the streets, walking through the High Line provides the average city-dweller with a wholly unique perspective of the avenues and surrounding buildings.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

And the park design itself situates the visitor in a strangely linear but dynamic environment. The benches that seem to be rising from the ground are an example of this.

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The design statement refers to these as 'peel-up' benches.

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Old meets new.

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Source: Friends of the High Line

Some sections are more lush than others.

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And there are water fountains dotting the footpaths.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Sometimes, when the path narrows and the vegetation stands above you, the noise of the city is dulled.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

But just a couple hundred feet later, the path opens again. Park staff can be seen trimming plants throughout the day.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

The seasonal change in the park is a wonderful aspect. Here in late fall, leaves on some of the trees were still shifting colour.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

'The plant selection favours native, drought-tolerant, and low-maintenance species, cutting down on the resources that go into the landscape.'

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Some of the walkways are raised above the tracks, which still follow below among the trees and plants.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Here's another look-out area, turning morning traffic into a sightseeing opportunity.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Another aspect of the High Line's charm is the artwork spotted both on street level and throughout the park itself.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Graffiti, statues, temporary installations. Nothing is outside the realm of possibility.

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This looks like spray-painted graffiti.

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But upon closer inspection, the piece by Damián Ortega is actually rebar steel.

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Source: Art at the High Line

One consequence of the elevated park is the proximity of nearby apartment buildings. The High Line effectively puts thousands of people within eyesight of some residential windows.

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As a result, it seems as though renting out or selling these non-private residencies could be tough.

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Another overgrown pathway leads into one of the park's most popular spots.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

The lawn! Yes. There is a lawn on a park on an old train track on a 30-foot-high platform.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

And even the lawn-mowing is done with style here. In the summer, people crowd and covet those bleacher-style sitting areas.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

The weed whacker was nearby for more garden clean-up.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Plants were being watered.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

After the lawn area, the pathway narrows again. This can be tough to navigate with crowds, but the early morning stroll was delightful.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

There are stairways leading down to the street, in case you're not up for walking the full 30 blocks at once.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Here you can see another traffic-watching nook set into the path.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

And more peel-up benches.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Despite the November chill in the air, some flowering vines were thriving.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

As you approach the end of the High Line, the park widens and becomes more interactive. There are food stalls and tables for people-watching or snacking.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

These wooden lounge chairs roll along the train-tracks on wheels. You can push two together for a cosy chaise experience. These are also hard to snag in the summer, where people bring books and picnic lunches to lounge around with for hours on end.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Farther south, the park passes underneath the Standard Hotel and down toward Gansevoort Street.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

Here's the view of the ending stretch. The plants hang over the side, threaten to overtake the Meatpacking District.

Kim Renfro/Tech Insider

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