LEAKED: Xiaomi's First Laptop Looks Just Like A MacBook Air

Xiaomi has been accused of copying Apple’s designs for its phones and tablets.

Now it’s about to be accused of copying Apple’s laptop designs.

This laptop, leaked by Gizmochina (via 9to5Mac), looks nearly identical to Apple’s MacBook Air.

The site says this will be Xiaomi’s first laptop.

Everything about the computer, from the aluminium teardrop frame to the hinge to the black keyboard, is straight out of Apple’s playbook. The only discernible differences: A small Xiaomi logo is adorned directly below the display, and the power button is orange instead of black.

Xiaomi’s laptop will reportedly be powered by Intel chips like Apple’s thin notebook line, but the Gizmochina report says it could cost about half the price of the MacBook Air, at around $US481.

Check out Gizmochina for more on the specs and price of the alleged Xiaomi laptop, as well as more pictures.

Xiaomi is the largest smartphone maker in China, and the most valuable startup in the world having just raised $US1.1 billion at a $US45 billion valuation. It’s also been compared to Apple, for several reasons: Not only do their products share obvious design similarities, but Xiaomi, like Apple, has built a passionate fan base in its home, where product launches feel more like rock concerts.

Lei Jun, Xiaomi’s founder and CEO, even wears Steve Jobs’ iconic blue jeans, black shirt and tennis shoes during product announcements. He’s even used Jobs’ signature “One more thing” on at least one occasion.

When Apple’s design chief Jony Ive was asked what he thought about Xiaomi, he said, “I don’t see it as flattery, I see it as theft.”

“I have to be honest,” Ive said. “The last think I think is ‘Oh, that is flattering…all those weekends I could’ve been home with my family… I think it’s theft and it’s lazy. I don’t think it’s OK at all.”

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