Women who were born before women's suffrage are casting their ballots for Clinton

I Waited 96 YearsI Waited 96 YearsEstelle Schultz from I Waited 96 Years!

98-year-old Estelle Schultz was born two years before the 19th Amendment — which gave women the right to vote — passed in 1920. In October, she marked her absentee ballot for Hillary Clinton, 96 years after women’s suffrage.

Her granddaughter, Sarah Benor, posted a photo of Schultz holding up her ballot, which quickly went viral.

Benor told NPR the post’s popularity inspired the pair to start a site honouring women like Schultz, who were born before women’s suffrage and are now voting for the first female presidential candidate in US history.

Called “I Waited 96 Years!,” the site features photos of women, ranging in age from 96 to 103 years, as well as a few facts about them.

One 103-year-old Clinton voter, Mary Norton, told the site that she is a daughter of Irish immigrants.

“I admire Hillary greatly and am very excited to vote for her for president,” she wrote. “I already voted for her in the New York Democratic primary.”

Since it launched in late October, nearly 100 women have joined the site. It profiles voters from a little over half of the states.

They seem to understand the historic nature of this year’s election.

“I did not have the right to vote upon my birth,” wrote Jean Friedman, another woman on the site. “At my current age of 99, I needed to vote to make sure women would continue to have a voice and decision about their own lives.”

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