Woman Alleges In Court Document That She Was Forced To Have Sex With Prince Andrew While Underage

Prince AndrewReuters/Chip EastPrince Andrew in 2011.

A woman has alleged in a US court document that she was repeatedly forced to have sexual intercourse with Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, the Guardian reports. 

The woman filed the accusation against the prince, 54, in a motion at a Florida court this week. It comes as part of a long-running lawsuit brought by women who claim they were exploited by multimillionaire banker Jeffrey Epstein — a past friend of the Duke’s. Apparently, in 2011, prince Andrew broke off contact with the banker. It’s been said in the past that he knew about Epstein’s abuse

The woman, who remains anonymous, alleges that between 1999 and 2002 she was repeatedly abused by Epstein, the Guardian writes. She alleges that the American investment banker loaned her to his rich and powerful friends as a “sex slave.”

Epstein was convicted of soliciting sex with an underage girl after a plea deal. He was released in 2009. 

The new court papers add to a long-running lawsuit charging federal prosecutors with “violating a victims-rights law by failing to consult with Epstein’s victims before signing off on a plea deal,” POLITICO notes. In the new papers, the woman alleges that at age 17, considered a minor in Florida, she “was forced to have sexual relations with this prince” in London, New York, and on a private Caribbean island, which Epstein owns. 

The prince is not a named party to the legal claim. It’s directed at federal prosecutors. The Duke hasn’t had an opportunity so far to respond to the accusations. Buckingham Palace reportedly declined to comment. 

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