The Justice Department is poised to release a redacted version of the Mueller report 'within a week'

  • Attorney General William Barr on Tuesday said he would be “in a position” to release a redacted version of the special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report in the Russia investigation “within a week.”
  • On March 24, Barr released a four-page review of Mueller’s findings regarding Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in the investigation.
  • Barr is redacting information that falls into four categories: grand-jury information, classified information, information that could compromise intelligence sources and methods, and information that could hurt the reputation and privacy of peripheral third parties.
  • Barr has drawn increased scrutiny from congressional Democrats and the public since several media outlets reported last week that some members of Mueller’s team were dissatisfied and frustrated with Barr’s characterization of their findings.
  • Those people also reportedly believe that their findings are more dangerous to Trump than Barr has publicly indicated.

Attorney General William Barr on Tuesday said he’d be prepared to release a redacted version of the special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report “within a week.”

On March 24, Barr released an initial four-page review of Mueller’s findings in the Russia investigation. Barr wrote that Mueller did not find sufficient evidence to charge President Donald Trump or anyone associated with his campaign with conspiring with the Russian government during the 2016 election.

He also said that Mueller did not come to a conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice in the investigation but added that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein decided the president did not commit an obstruction crime. Barr’s conclusions, primarily in the obstruction inquiry, immediately sparked calls for the full report to be made public.

Barr testified about the Justice Department’s budget Tuesday before a House appropriations subcommittee. During the hearing, Democratic Rep. Nita Lowey zeroed in on the 48-hour period within which Mueller turned in his final report – which is said to be nearly 400 pages in length – and when Barr and Rosenstein concluded Trump did not obstruct justice.

Asked how he came to his decision so quickly, Barr replied that he and Rosenstein met with Mueller and his team on March 5 and had a “preliminary discussion” about the report. Because of that, Barr said, he had “an inkling as to what was coming in our direction.”

The attorney general also told lawmakers he did not consult the White House on the March 24 letter or send it an advance copy.


Read more:
After reports Mueller’s team was annoyed with the attorney general’s summary of their work, the DOJ says the Mueller report can’t be released yet because every page contains confidential information

In a March 29 letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee’s chairman, Lindsey Graham, and the House Judiciary Committee’s chairman, Jerry Nadler, Barr said he was working with Mueller’s team to release as much of the report as possible to the public.

But last week, Barr was caught up in a firestorm when several media outlets reported that members of the special counsel’s team were frustrated and dissatisfied with Barr’s characterization of their findings in the Russia investigation. Prosecutors are also said to have prepared several summaries of their findings and were upset the attorney general did not include more material from the summaries in his initial review.

Following the revelations, the Justice Department released a statement saying every page of the report included sensitive grand-jury information that had to be redacted before the report could be released.

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