Everyone should follow this simple rule for buying clothing

Geoffrey Zakarian.Food NetworkHost Geoffrey Zakarian poses on set, as seen on Food Network’s Cooks vs. Cons

“Fashions fade, style is eternal.”

Fashion industry icons from Coco Chanel to Yves Saint Laurent have echoed that sentiment, and it still remains as relevant as ever.

Spending money on trendy items is akin to throwing it away, says Iron Chef, Food Network host, and all-around stylish guy Geoffrey Zakarian.

“I would advise against fashion,” Zakarian told Business Insider. “Never follow fashion, because you will be following a loser’s hole of money. Every year you’ll be throwing stuff away.”

In order to shop according to this rule, Zakarian deploys a steady, calculating hand.

“You have to spend a little bit more,” Zakarian said. “If you really spend correctly and really buy good stuff that lasts and doesn’t go out of style, you’ll have a great wardrobe for the rest of your life. You can pass it down to your kids if you take care of it.”

Another tip: versatility.

“If there’s not three or four uses for something, I don’t buy it,” Zakarian said.

If all this sounds like a commitment, that’s because it is.

“Nothing’s easy. If you’re going to curate something correctly you need to spend time,” Zakarian said. “Just like if you want to cook dinner you’ve got to spend time actually doing it, you’ve got to do a little work.”

But what you’ll have by the end of the process is a simple, dependable, versatile wardrobe full of quality clothing that you genuinely love. Perfect for taking on whatever you need to do next.

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