Why 16 million people have watched drone footage of a road being built in remote Australia

A bird’s eye view of the road building. Image: Moora Shire

A 4.9 kilometre stretch of lonely road built in just two days in Australia has become what some are calling the most famous road in the world.

A 3 minute and 16 second clip of the road works near the town of Moora in Western Australia’s wheatbelt has gone viral and has now been seen by more than 16 million people.

The vision is strangely compelling. Those building the road attack the task with precision, rolling out a road in an absolutely straight line, each piece of machinery and each person doing an allocated job in unison.

The Facebook page of the Moora Shire, the tiny council area with 2500 residents about 180 kilometres north of Perth, now has 64,000 likes.

The clip taken by a drone has been shared almost 390,000 times and 105,000 have left a reaction or comment.

The upgrade work on the Airstrip Road cost $443,000, or about $90 a metre, through the state’s Roads to Recovery Funding Program.

“A great job by our road works crew and Trevor Longman with the Shire’s drone for the footage,” the council said in a post to Facebook.

Many of the comments on Facebook are of wonder and admiration of the road crew for the speed and exactness of their work.

“No mucking around with these guys,” said Santi Samuels-Taylor. “Please come and do the road works in my town. Cause that’s what they do here, just a bunch of muck arounds.”

“Would love to see that footage played backwards, slightly speeded up and with the Benny Hill theme as background music,” said Tony Lake.

Physiotherapist Marcus Holliday took a selfie of himself with what he called the world’s most famous road:

“Never seen anyone reverse that straight, never, too precise!!!” said Barry Van Staden.

On the negative side, some questioned whether the road building method used, the chip-seal, would last.

Here’s the footage:

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