Here's Where The Richest And Poorest People Live In 10 Major US Cities

Pew

If you’re looking for concrete evidence of the ever widening gap between America’s rich and poor, here’s a hint: check your area code.
Now more than ever, American neighborhoods tend to be segregated by income, according to a recent study Cornell’s Kendra Bischoff and Stanford’s Sean F. Reardon.

That means the rich are living near the rich and the poor are packed together in large sections of the country’s biggest metropolitan areas, and that creates a vicious cycle for poor families.

The latest findings confirm a Pew Research report from last year, which mapped the income segregation in America’s biggest cities.

Boston is the least segregated of the top 10. It saw pretty modest population gains over the last 30 years. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Boston earned a RISI score of 36. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Atlanta stumped Pew with a record population growth and a relatively slow growth in economic segregation. 'Atlanta is the main outlier,' Pew says. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Atlanta earned a RISI score of 41. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Chicago falls on the low end of economic segregation. Its relatively low population growth rate (17 per cent in 30 years) might have something to do with it. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Chicago earned a RISI score of 41. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

With four-point growth since 1980, D.C. actually falls slightly under the average segregation score for the Northeast (48). (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Washington, D.C. earned a RISI score of 47. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Thanks in part to immigration and population growth, Miami has seen 20-point growth in its economic segregation. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Miami earned a RISI score of 49. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Philadelphia's sits three points above the average for economic segregation in the Northeast. Nearly 40 per cent of poor households live in majority poor areas. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Philadelphia earned a RISI score of 51. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Since 1980, L.A.'s segregation score increased by only four points, but it's still 19 points higher than the average for Western cities. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Los Angeles earned a RISI score of 51. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

New York is far more economically segregated than the average Northeast metro area. Its overall segregation score jumped nine points since 1980. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

New York City earned a RISI score of 57. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Along with Houston, Dallas has been among the nation's fastest-growing cities. That includes many low-income, low-skill immigrants as well as well-to-do retires, which is a contributing factor to its income segregation. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Dallas earned a RISI score of 60. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Houston is the most economically segregated city in America. Income segregation here has gotten twice as bad since 1980. (Red is low income. Blue is high income.)

Houston earned a RISI score of 61. Pew's Residential Income Segregation Index (RISI) is calculated by adding the rate of lower-income households living in a majority lower-income tract and the rate of upper-income households living in a majority upper-income tract. The maximum score is 200.

Now see the wealth gap from outer space...

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