What The New iPhone Means For Marketers

iphone 3g s

SAN FRANCISCO (AdAge.com) — Apple executives didn’t throw any curve balls at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference today in San Francisco. But the iterative changes hidden within a new, faster iPhone — and the previously announced software upgrade — could change not just consumer but also advertiser behaviour. Here’s a run-down of what’s new and what it means to marketers.

What’s new: Apple introduced the new iPhone 3GS, which includes an updated operating system. It will hit AT&T stores, its exclusive carrier, for $199 with a contract.

Why it matters for marketers: Speed (yes, that’s what the “S” stands for) is the key. Billed by Apple as the “fastest, most powerful iPhone,” the new handset from the Cupertino, Calif.-based company will provide faster downloads, while the phone’s greater memory and processing speed will allow advertisers to dial up more rich-media ad units. The news coincides with AT&T’s recent announcement that it is upgrading its 3G network to deliver data faster.

 Ad Age Digital  DigitalNext  MediaWorks “People are already using their phones as mini-computers,” said Tina Unterlaender, account director at digital agency AKQA. “But the faster speeds will change user behaviour even more. It’s going to change the way whole new generations access the internet, and it’s going to mean that brands will have to redistribute their marketing mix if they want to reach a young group.”

Krish Arvapally, chief technology officer of mobile ad platform provider Mojiva, said since Apple announced its new iPhone software in March, it has seen a 20% increase in the number of advertisers who say they want to target iPhone users.

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