It's been 5 years since the iPad was unveiled -- look how terrible the first one was

Photo: Justin Sullivan/ Getty.

The first iPad was released on April 3, 2010, and it’s come a long way since then.

The iPad Air 2, which Apple launched late last year, is a super slim, powerful, and gorgeous device.

But I couldn’t say the same about the first iPad. The original iPad was a revolutionary device at the time — some believed it could eventually replace your laptop.

Critics praised Apple for launching apps that were actually optimised for the iPad’s larger screen that weren’t just stretched-out iPhone apps.

Still, like any first-generation tech product, the original iPad had a lot of limitations.

The first iPad didn't support Adobe Flash, which many websites required to display media content.

It didn't have any cameras, so no video chatting, taking selfies, or awkwardly holding up your iPad to take a photo.

It was a lot chunkier and heavier than today's iPads.

The first iPad was 1.5 pounds. The iPad Air 2, by comparison, weighs less than 1 pound.

It was a lot thicker too. The first iPad was half an inch thick, while today's iPad is only 0.2 inches thin.

Look how big the bezels around the screen were on the original iPad.

Now check out how slim they are on the iPad Air 2.

Apple's newer iPads are easier to hold, too. The first iPad had a curved back that made it a little thicker.

Here's the back of the iPad Air, for comparison.

The Wi-Fi version of the first iPad didn't have a GPS chip either.

So that means you wouldn't be able to use it for real-time navigation.

The screen was way less sharp, too. In fact, it only packed 132 pixels per inch, which is half as sharp as the iPad Air 2.

Now check out some apps for the iPad you'll need to be rich to afford...

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