What Picasso Can Teach You About Money

Photo: Flickr / wallyg

One of my favourite quotes on happiness has been attributed to Pablo Picasso:”I’d like to live as a poor man with lots of money.” 

Opaque? Perhaps. But I think what Picasso meant is that when we don’t have much money, little luxuries excite us. I can still remember the first time I bought brand-name Ziploc bags at the grocery store, rather than the generic sandwich bags I’d grown up with.

If you’re a poor graduate student, the mere experience of going out to eat can be blissful. When you get more money, you stop viewing restaurant meals as anything outside the norm. So you start complaining that the service is slow, the meat is too salty, and so forth.

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to go out to eat all the time, and still think it was the coolest thing in the world? 

Humans have a difficult time thinking this way — most of us are on the “hedonic treadmill” to some degree or another. We get used to things, and it takes more and more to excite us. 

See the full post at CBS Money Watch.

Now see 20 napkin sketches that will teach you everything you need to know about money >

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.