Here's What It's Really Like To Fly Scoot, The World's Newest Budget Long-Haul Airline

Scoot Airlines, aeroplane, Scoot

Photo: Scoot Airlines

travellers, meet Scoot, Singapore Airlines’ newest addition to the long-haul, no-frills, budget game. CNN Go’s Ramy Inocencio flew a $400 flight from Signapore to Sydney last week to see what all the fuss was about. Turns out you get what you pay for.

Here’s what that means for globe-trekkers: 

Late departures. “Nearly two hours after Scoot’s scheduled departure time, the plane gained speed down the runway.” Departure time? 1:20 a.m.

Fewer bags. Booking the cheapest option, “Fly,” means only you and your carry-on bag are able to get on board, said Inocencio. No checked-in bags are allowed. Choosing “FlyBag” ups the ticket price by about $15 and lets travellers check in a bag weighing up to 15 kilos. The next option, “FlyBagEat,” offers a combo meal with a checked bag and carry-on. 

Not much leg room. “At 10 seats across in a tight 3-4-3 configuration, seat width was a pretty narrow 17 inches. Scoot’s website suggests that ‘extra cuddly guests’ buy two seats,” Incencio said. However, passengers can purchase S-T-R-E-T-C-H seats for $4 to $12 more, depending on the length of the flight. 

Pricey entertainment. Most long-haul airlines go big with the in-flight entertainment such as music, TV and movies. Not Scoot. This carrier treats passengers to pre-loaded iPads—for $17 extra. 

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