Applying For A Job At Facebook Is Like Three Months In Limbo

Facebook office tour

An anonymous writer has detailed his experience applying for a job at Facebook on All Facebook.

It sounds like a depressingly typical job-hunt.

Facebook kept him in contention for three and half months before unceremoniously dumping him with an email that essentially said “We’ve filled the position.”

The anonymous applicant was applying for a non-engineering position. He hints it was a developer spot where and ability to code wasn’t needed, but would be useful.

His background is “a combination of coding, database, business analysis, writing and inbound/social media marketing skills.”

While the overall experience was similar to any hiring process, there’s plenty of specifics to learn for would-be Facebook applications.

  • It’s helpful to know somebody. The position was listed online but this guy had a friend put his resume in front of the right people. So go make friends with Facebook employees.
  • First there was a phone interview, then a coding test, and writing assignment. The applicant had one week to complete them.
  • The next interview was a much longer one, and it had a surprise quiz. The applicant had to go a computer, “type in the algorithm (aka “pseudocode”) for a coding problem,” he says. His interviewers saw the code as he created it, and tested it.
  • Two months after the first phone interview, he gets a sit down, 3 hour interview at Facebook’s offices.
  • During the interview he was asked a number of technical questions, because he had certain skills listed on his resume. In retrospect, he wishes he had answered a few questions with “I don’t know,” as a response. Rather than stumbling through answers, he thinks it’s OK to admit he’d have to look certain things up.
  • Six weeks after the sit down interview, Facebook emailed to say it wouldn’t be hiring him.

Now that you have some idea about how to get a job there, take a tour of Facebook’s Palo Alto headquarters →

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