What Does A Work-Friendly iPhone Mean For RIM?

At a media presentation this afternoon, Apple boss Steve Jobs will unveil his plans to improve the iPhone’s software offerings, including “some exciting new enterprise features.”

Many expect Jobs to address the iPhone’s lousy support for corporate email — an important feature upgrade as Apple (AAPL) competes head-to-head with Research In Motion’s (RIMM) BlackBerry smartphones, best known for their email capabilities.

The conventional thinking is that Apple’s gain here is bad news for RIM. But not necessarily.

That’s because one scenario would involve Apple working with RIM — by licensing its “BlackBerry Connect” software, which would allow the iPhone to synch up with BlackBerry servers.

That’d be good news for RIM, AmTech analyst Rob Sanderson argues. The smartphone market is still growing rapidly, so there’s plenty of room for both gadget makers. And if Steve Jobs recommends RIM’s software as the best way to get business email on an iPhone, the endorsement solidifies RIM as the industry leader — and punishes competing products from Microsoft (MSFT) and Motorola (MOT).

See Also:
Apple’s iPhone Enterprise Opportunity: Big, But Not Huge
How Apple’s iPhone Could Invade The Enterprise Market
Apple: We Don’t Care About Unlocked iPhones
Apple Affirms 10 Million iPhones, Says “Nuts” to Wall Street Bears
iPhone Sales Stunted? No, Apple Can Still Hit 10mm
Apple: iPhone Software Kit Coming March 6
Steve Jobs: Frequent Flier
Apple’s “Useless” iPhone Takes 3rd Place In Q4

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