What Does A Bing Party Look Like? Photos From Web 2.0 Summit, Day Two

Wednesday was a big day for Microsoft at the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco. Why?

  • It announced and showed off a neat, new Twitter search function for Bing.
  • It made Google look pathetic when it rushed out a “me-too” announcement (with no product) hours later.
  • It threw one of the conference’s biggest parties — a very tacky event at the Ruby Skye nightclub, featuring “Bingtinis.”

Check out more photos from the Web 2.0 Summit! >

John Battelle explains why we won't get to hear any F-bombs today -- Yahoo's Carol Bartz has called in sick

Neat chart showing when people checked in to the conference, tracking mobile phone signals

Microsoft's Qi Lu explains how Bing will destroy Google in the search market

Microsoft's Yusuf Mehdi wants to know why everyone is Googling for news about Bing's Twitter deal

Sorry, world: It's sunny and warm here in SF

One of the box lunch options: Prosciutto sandwich. Also available: Teriyaki chicken and salmon bento box

Inside the Bing lounge at the conference hotel

Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg shows how big the site's ad business is getting

HuffPo CEO Eric Hippeau right before the NYT called his site a copyright thief

NYT digital boss Nisenholtz thinks up more mean things to say about Web news aggregators

Mark Cuban hugs Kara Swisher, securing his invitation to All Things D next year

Cookies!

Guitar Hero's Dan Rosensweig still thrilled he left Yahoo

Google's Marissa Mayer rushes out a me-too announcement that Google has a Twitter deal

Who here has a Facebook account? asks MySpace CEO Owen Van Natta

Brooke Burke explains Mommyblogging to Mark Cuban

MySpace Buzz? or Bunn? energy drink

Microsoft's tacky Bing party at Ruby Skye, way too late

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