What colour Should Men Wear To Be More Attractive To Women?

In many nonhuman species of vertebrates, females are attracted to red on male conspecifics. Red is also a signal of male status in many nonhuman vertebrate species, and females show a mating preference for high-status males. These red–attraction and red–status links have been found even when red is displayed on males artificially. In the present research, we document parallels between human and nonhuman females’ response to male red. Specifically, in a series of 7 experiments we demonstrate that women perceive men to be more attractive and sexually desirable when seen on a red background and in red clothing, and we additionally show that status perceptions are responsible for this red effect. The influence of red appears to be specific to women’s romantic attraction to men: Red did not influence men’s perceptions of other men, nor did it influence women’s perceptions of men’s overall likability, agreeableness, or extraversion. Participants showed no awareness that the research focused on the influence of colour. These findings indicate that colour not only has aesthetic value but can carry meaning and impact psychological functioning in subtle, important, and provocative ways.

Source: “Red, rank, and romance in women viewing men.” from Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Vol 139(3), Aug 2010, 399-417.

What’s interesting is I’ve posted in the past about how red makes women more attractive to men. Seriously, there is something about the colour red. I’ve posted about its other effects before here and here.

You should follow me on Facebook here or on Twitter. You’ll find content there I don’t post anywhere else. You can also subscribe via email or RSS. Check out the blog’s most popular posts of all time.

 

Related Posts:

Are beautiful people more intelligent?

Should men who want to be more attractive to women read Byron?

Does having a high-status car really make a man more attractive to women?

Is a physician’s evaluation of patient pain affected by how attractive the patient is?

Are attractive people less likely to be convicted of a crime and more likely to get a shorter sentence?

Do we change our voice when we talk to attractive people of the opposite sex?

Are attractive people more trusting when they think they can be seen?

Permalink [Leave a comment  »


Read more posts on Barking Up The Wrong Tree »

NOW WATCH: Ideas videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.