These 2 charts show how millennials and Gen Zers need completely different things to love their jobs

Jose Luis Magana/APWhat college graduates want from their future employers has shifted over time.
  • The things new entrants to the US labour force value have changed throughout the 2010s.
  • Employer branding specialist firm Universum runs an annual survey of tens of thousands of college students, asking what they are looking for from their future employers.
  • We looked at the job attributes that had the biggest positive and negative changes in support on the survey between 2010 and 2019.
  • Fewer students at the end of the decade wanted quick opportunities for promotion, while flexible working conditions became more desirable over time.
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The nature of work in the US is always changing, and the things new entrants to the labour force value have changed during the 2010s.

Employer branding specialist firm Universum runs an annual survey of tens of thousands of college students, asking people about to enter the workforce what they are looking for from their future employers.

Universum provided Business Insider with an exclusive analysis of which job characteristics students in the US said were important to them going back to the start of the decade, and how their priorities have changed. We looked at the attributes students considered important that had the biggest positive and negative changes between 2010 and 2019.

The “traditional” age range for college students is between 18- and 22-years-old. At the start of the decade, everyone in that age range was part of the millennial generation, according to Pew Research Centre’s definition of millennials as being born between 1981 and 1996. By 2015, 18-year-old traditional college freshmen were part of the subsequent Gen Z, and as the decade closed out, Gen Zers made up the entire population of 18- to 22-year-olds.

Here are the four attributes with the biggest increases over the last decade. More students at the end of the decade were looking for flexible work options than at the start. Opportunities for long-term career development also saw increases.

Universum attribute increasesBusiness Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from UniversumThe share of students who want flexible work conditions has increased a lot over the last decade.

Here are the four job attributes with the biggest decreases between 2010 and 2019. Fewer students at the end of the decade were explicitly looking for challenging work or to quickly move up the company ladder. Students in 2019 were also less likely to emphasise further education and performance-related bonuses.

Universum attribute declinesBusiness Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from UniversumFewer students say that sponsorship of future education is important than they did in 2010.

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