A Chinese city banned dog walking in the daytime, one of a string of measures to crack down on pets

  • Wenshan city in southern China banned dog walking between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m., said leads must be a maximum of one meter long, and banned kids from walking dogs.
  • A government official said the times were chosen to avoid disturbing people out exercising, or on their way to work.
  • Modern China’s founding father Mao Zedong called dogs a “bourgeois affectation” but they are now widespread across the country.

The municipal government of a city in southern China banned dog owners from walking their dogs in daylight hours, as well as putting in other strict rules to curb their presence.

The city of Wenshan in Yunnan Province, near the Vietnam border, banned dog-walkers from being out in public with their pets between 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., The South China Morning Press reported.

The ban started in early November and also forces people to use leads under one meter in length, and outlaws children from walking dogs.

Resident will also have to avoid taking their dogs to parks, shopping centres, sports facilities, and other public spaces,Sky News reported.


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A Wenshan urban management official said the curfew was imposed to stop dogs inconveniencing other residents.

The unnamed official said: “There are many people about [after 7 a.m.] and they will be inconvenienced by having dogs around them,” The South China Morning Press reported.

The official said: “After 10 p.m. there would be almost no people on the street.”

The official also said that in the run up to the ban they had recieved a number of calls about dog attacks, but none since the new law came in, the paper reported.

Modern China’s founding father Mao Zedong once called dogs a “bourgeois affectation,” but they are now widespread across the country.

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