Meet Wendy Schmidt: The Wife Of Google Billionaire Eric Schmidt Is Building A Legacy In Nantucket

Eric Schmidt Wendy SchmidtEric and Wendy Schmidt

Photo: By Amy Sussman/Getty Images

Wendy Schmidt, wife of Google chairman Eric Schmidt, got a huge profile in the New York Times with the hook being that she’s become an influential force in Nantucket.Here are the highlights of Ms. Schmidt’s life:

  • Wendy met Eric at UCal Berkeley where he was getting a doctorate in computer science: “I edited his thesis, I will have you know that … That is one of our little laughs.”
  • They married in 1980, and have two children.
  • While Eric become the CEO of Google and a big shot in tech, Wendy never really took to the Silicon Valley scene: “I am not really a joiner.”
  • She became a trustee of the Natural Resources defence Council, established the Schmidt family foundation and worked on climate change issues.
  • In 1999 the Schmidts bought a house in Nantucket.
  • In 2007, Wendy started ReMain Nantucket a philanthropic organisation dedicated to maintaining the quaint downtown style the affluent island is known for. Eric says, “She had a reaction to the rich people who were there and didn’t do anything.”
  • She also bought a liquor store for $3.5 million, a book store for $3.2 million, and worked with a group overseeing a $35 million renovation of a theatre.
  • She has had to learn to navigate the tricky social circles of a place like Nantucket. It’s hard to be the new woman in town, trying to shake things up.
  • With all her time in Nantucket, some people are whispering about the state of her marriage. “I do live fairly independently,” she tells the Times, later adding, “I think it’s nonsense and, between us, if we know what is going on in our lives and we are happy, that kind of stuff is part of his being in the public eye … You know, people will write things. You just have to ignore them.”
  • Eric, for his part, when asked about relationships with women outside his marriage says, “I don’t think that is an appropriate question. We don’t comment on that, rumours.”

Read the full story at the New York Times →

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