Wellness Programs Make 45% Of Employees Healthier, But The Benefits Could Go Even Further [STUDY]

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Photo: Flickr Mauricio Balvanera

Those extra trips to the gym courtesy of your employer may have done more good for your health than you realise, a new study finds. 40-one per cent of workers said wellness programs made them happier and more productive at work, according to the latest Principal Financial Well-Being Index.

And better health means time on the job: About 35 per cent said they missed fewer days, while 52 per cent said their energy had increased.

Nearly half (45 per cent) of the study’s respondents said the programs were worth it, but there’s still a bit of a disconnect when it comes to what the companies are offering and what workers want. 

The most common wellness packages included online wellness information and educational tools or resources, but 25 per cent of those without discounts to the gym said they would prefer a workout pass instead.

Respondents also said that on-site preventive screenings, access to nutritionists and weight management programs would ramp up their enthusiasm for employer’s wellness programs. (See what it really costs to hire a dietician). 

Ironically, only 13 per cent of the 1,121 workers surveyed said the programs were “very successful” in improving their actual health. Perhaps they’ve been eating the wrong food at their desk? 

Now see 15 ways to get the hot bod you’ve always wanted without breaking the bank >

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