The Weird Effects You Can Get Out Of The HTC One And Its 3D Camera

HTC hasn’t really changed much about its flagship smartphone, the new One.

The beautiful all-metal design has only been slightly tweaked, the screen is just a hair larger than the previous version’s display, and the new One’s processor is only a bit faster than the last. But there’s one area that’s seen a drastic improvement: its camera.

HTC has not only added a second camera lens for adding 3D effect to images, but it’s also beefed up its photo-editing tools.

The primary camera uses HTC’s “UltraPixel” technology, which is supposedly capable of capturing more light than cameras that use the traditional megapixel.

We spent some time snapping photos and editing pictures with the HTC One. Here’s what we came away with.

This is a photo we took of a lamp post in Madison Square Park using the Sketch Foregrounder effect. It basically preserves the main subject of the photo and converts the background of an image into a sketch.

This image was shot in a shooting mode called Dots. As its name implies, it portrays your image as a cluster of multicolored dots. It's often difficult to tell what's actually in the photograph, but this is an image of buildings in New York City's Flatiron District.

HTC really played up the One's UFocus feature when it announced the phone. It allows you to tap to focus anywhere on the photo, creating a 'bokeh'-style effect.

Like the iPhone, HTC's One is also capable of capturing sweeping panoramic shots. This one was taken during sunset on a rooftop in Queens.

This is what our newsroom would look like if it were a cartoon. It's another Foregrounder effect, meaning it preserves the subject in the foreground of the image. If you look closely you'll notice that the desk on the right side of the photo looks normal.

The depth of field shooting mode creates an effect similar to that of UFocus. You can drag the focus point to a particular object in your field of view to make it appear sharp while the rest of the scene is blurred.

This is one of the more odd photography effects. The distortion shooting mode warps the subject of your image, creating a fun-house-style effect.

Here's where the HTC One's Duo Camera really comes into play. This is how 3D effects look on the One. The image changes as you move your phone, and it works more accurately the closer you are to your subject. In this image, it looks like wine is swirling in the glass.

(image url='http://static.businessinsider.com/image/533dce15eab8ea295c0c756c/htc3dwine.gif' alt='HTC3DWine' link='lightbox' size='secondary' align='right' clear='true')

You can also make really creepy photos with the HTC One. The eye enhancer tool in the Touch Up category lets you enlarge your eyes to an extremely eerie degree.

HTC refers to the One's front-facing camera as Selfie Mode. You can use both the main and front cameras at the same time, just like you can on Samsung's Galaxy S4. It's not particularly useful, but it is fun to mess around with occasionally.

Now check out what else you can do with the HTC One...

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