Eleven Bizarre Beauty Contraptions From The Last Century

nose advertisement

Photo: Weird Universe

“You have a beautiful faceā€¦ But your nose?” If you were alive in the early 20th century and you didn’t like your nose, the good news is that you didn’t have to resort to expensive and painful rhinoplasty.The bad news is that your other option involved this painful-looking and unsightly Trados Nose-Shaper. Model 22 was pretty popular in 1918, if the number of ads is any indication, but “Face Specialist” M. Trilety didn’t stop there. By 1928, Trilety was a “Pioneering Noseshaping Specialist who offered quick, painless and permanent nose correction with Model 25.

Dimple Stamper

Giant Stationary Hairdryer

Short hair was all the rage in the Twenties, but even a bob needs a good blowout. The first portable handheld hairdryer was invented in 1920, but that didn't stop some intrepid soul from building this massive industrial-strength version sometime soon after. Given that it stands on six legs and appears to be rather heavy, we can probably assume that this model didn't grab much of the hairdryer market.

Dr. Lecter's Masks

Vibrators

Electrified Masks

Self-Service Chin Straps

Asphyxia Hoods

Magnetic Binding

You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who can tell you how magnets work, but one thing is for certain: they can cure just about anything. OK, it's not true, but no one mentioned that to Thomson, Langdon & Co., manufacturers of the Wilsonia Magnetic Corset, which advertised itself as both a remedy for indigestion, paralysis and nervousness and the key to a teensy tiny waist.

Miracle-Gro for Hair

Women weren't the only ones to benefit from high-tech beauty aids in the early 1900s. A slew of baldness-reversing devices flooded the market, all promising improved hair growth and slower hair loss. One such instrument was Merke Institutes' Thermocap, which was meant to stimulate dormant hair with heat and blue lights.

Taking that approach one step further, the hair and scalp device shown here stimulated the scalp by sending an arc of sparks from the blown glass attachments to the head. Seems legit.

Pinpointed Flaw Detection

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