WEEKEND FEED: Quick And Easy Seafood Recipes

The Sydney Seafood School has been busy coming up with some new, quick and easy seafood recipes for the Sydney Fish Market, and now has more than 200 recipes online.

There everything from classics such as prawn bisque, sole meuniere, prawn cocktail, laksa, Vietnamese rice paper rolls, and lobster thermidor to seafood salads, curries, sandwiches, pasta and stir-fries.

You’ll also find plenty of cooking tips too, to help take away the fear many people have about cooking fish. We asked Sydney Seafood School manager Roberta Muir to share some of her favourites with Business Insider readers.

Bon appetit!

Easy Prawn Ravioli with Citrus Dressing

Prawn ravioli. Photo: Franz Scheurer

While certainly not traditional, egg wonton wrappers can be used to make a quick entrée when you don’t have the time or inclination to make your own fresh pasta.
Serves 8 as an entrée

Ingredients
¼ cup lemon juice
1 lemon, zest finely grated
100ml extra virgin olive oil
Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
48 egg wonton wrappers
1 egg white, lightly beaten
50g butter
6 green prawns, peeled and deveined with tails intact.
2 cloves garlic, crushed

Prawn Filling
500g green prawns, peeled and deveined
(you can also use bugs, crabmeat, marron or lobster)
1 egg white
Salt flakes and freshly ground white pepper, to taste
125ml cream
1 tablespoon finely snipped chives

Make Prawn Filling: process prawns in a food processor for 10 seconds. Add egg white, salt, pepper and cream, and process for a further 10 seconds or so, until it resembles thickly whipped cream. Stir through chives, cover and chill until required.

Whisk lemon juice, zest, oil, salt and pepper together in a large bowl and set aside.

Place 18 wonton wrapper on a work bench and place a heaped teaspoon of prawn mousse in the centre of each one. Brush exposed pasta well with egg white, place a second wrapper on top and press firmly to seal well, extracting as much air as possible. Using a ravioli cutter, cut into squares, close to the filling but leaving enough wrapper to seal the filling in.

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil and cook ravioli for 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a frying pan, add garlic, salt and prawns and cook for a few minutes, until prawns are opaque and just cooked through.

Drain ravioli, add to the bowl with the lemon mixture and toss gently. Serve 3 ravioli per person topped with a prawn and drizzled with the garlic butter from cooking the prawns.

Char-Grilled Salmon Kebabs & Vegetables with Lime Mayonnaise

Photo: Franz Scheurer

This is a great buffet dish served on a big platter for a barbecue or other casual gathering, but would also be an elegant entrée for 8 people if you made 16 small kebabs instead of the 8 larger ones.
You can also use fish such as bonito, mackerel, striped marlin, swordfish, and tuna. Serves 4

Ingredients
750g thick piece sashimi-grade salmon, skin off, pin-boned (see notes)
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
8 bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 1 hour
½ cup whole-egg mayonnaise (see notes)
1 tablespoon lime juice
3 zucchini, trimmed and sliced lengthways into 5mm-thick strips
3 Japanese eggplants, trimmed, sliced lengthways into 5mm-thick strips (see notes)
1 red capsicum, seeded and cut into thick slices
2 small red onions, cut into eighths
4 lime cheeks, to serve

Cut fish into large even cubes, place in a bowl and toss with a little of the oil, salt and pepper. Thread the cubes onto the skewers, cover and refrigerate until ready to cook.

Combine mayonnaise and lime juice; you may not need all of the juice. It should taste lightly tangy. Set aside.

Heat a barbecue or char-grill plate. Brush the zucchini, eggplants, capsicum and onions with remaining olive oil, salt and pepper, and cook for 2-4 minutes each side, until well coloured. Remove and set aside.

Cook the skewers for 30-60 seconds on each side, until the flesh is opaque almost all the way to the centre. Don’t cook them all the way through, as they’ll continue to cook after they are removed from the heat.

Arrange the vegetables in the centre of each plate with the skewers on top. Drizzle with some of the lime mayonnaise, garnish with a lime cheek and pass the rest of the mayonnaise separately.

Notes
Sashimi-grade fish is normally sold trimmed, if it is not, trim off any skin and dark muscle and check for bones before cutting it. If you don’t want to make your own mayonnaise, use one made from whole eggs such as Paul Newman’s Own or Thomy. Japanese eggplants are long thin purple eggplants, sometimes also called slipper or baby eggplants.

Mixed Shells in White Wine with Chorizo

Photo: Franz Scheurer

Chorizo is a Spanish sausage made with pork and paprika, available cured or raw – you could use either for this recipe. Pork and clams are a classic combination throughout the western Mediterranean, but you could always leave out the chorizo if you prefer.
Serves 4 as an entrée

Ingredients
⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
250g chorizo, chopped
½ cup dry white wine
Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
350g Sydney cockles, purged (see notes)
350g diamond clams, purged (see notes)
350g pipis, purged (see notes)
¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
Crusty bread, for serving

Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat, add garlic and chorizo and cook for a couple of minutes. Add wine, salt, pepper, and cockles, clams and pipis. Increase heat to high, cover and cook for a minute or 2, shaking often, until shells start to open. As each shell opens, remove from the pan to a bowl.

When all shells have opened, stir parsley through cooking liquid, pour over the shells, and serve with crusty bread.

Notes
Pipis and clams are usually sold ‘purged’ to remove sand and grit, however it’s still a good idea to place them in a large bowl of cool salted water and sea salt (30g salt per litre water) for several hours or overnight, at room temperature, to get rid of any remaining sand (if you refrigerate them they’ll close up and won’t ‘spit out’ the sand).

Alternative species: blue mussels, any clams, dog cockles, surf clams.

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