Bill Nye Dominated His Debate Against Creationist Ken Ham

Bill Nye debated creationist Ken Ham tonight.

We tweeted some of the interesting things that Nye said in the debate, some good insight from experts, and some images of Nye looking bewildered.

Check out the feed.

There’s also a good summary of the debate on the Liberty Voice, with all the questions asked.

Here are some of his best comments (paraphrased) that we caught.

The big take-home thoughts of the night were that we need our children to be educated in real science, not to base their thoughts on faith.

We need a society well-versed in science to build our future, Nye said.

Much of Ham’s 30-minute presentation included testimonials from creation scientists. Arguing that a few scientists are also creationists doesn’t mean that evolution isn’t true, Nye said.

Creationists say we can’t know the Earth’s true age, and say that our methods of dating of rocks is faulty because we can’t understand how the world worked in the past because there was no one there to see it. In reality, that’s just not true. Physics was the same yesterday as it will be tomorrow and long after we die.

We can also see that there are stars out in the universe that are more than 6,000 light years away. How can that be if God created the Heavens and Earth only 6,000 years ago?

When asked what would change his mind about creationism, Ham said nothing would. Because the bible says the Earth is 6,000 years old. And the bible will be proven right.

Creationists think we are all doomed for believing in an old Earth, but what about all the religious people who believe in God but were never exposed to creationist beliefs?

When asked about humans getting stupider over time, Nye responded:

Being smarter won’t make you more able to resist a plague, he said.

And most importantly:

You can watch the debate here if you missed it:

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