Turntable Is Definitely Legal Now -- It Has Partnerships With Sony, Universal, Warner And EMI

Ignition Conference 2011 Seth Goldstein Turntable.fm

Photo: Michael Seto

When Turntable first launched, people wondered if the service was legal. No deals were in place with music labels.Today Turntable is putting those questions to rest. It has secured partnerships with four major music labels, Universal, Sony, Warner and EMI.

The group listening startup has direct licenses in place so millions of songs can be legally steamed by users.

Spotify pays the labels every time a song of theirs is played. Turntable is not disclosing how their music label partners will be reimbursed. When asked if the labels were also investors, we were told: “They have an interest in seeing Turntable do well.”

One of the labels told us it was excited to partner with Turntable and view it as a way to expand the music marketplace.

“These relationships will enable us to work with a wider range of artists and to develop new features,” says Turntable co-founder Seth Goldstein. “They are also a first step in expanding internationally – something we continue to discuss with all the relevant rightsholders.”

It took Spotify three years to get similar licensing deals in place; Turntable has done the same in about eight months.

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