Ahead of his impeachment trial, CNN report says Trump remains fixated on getting revenge on Republicans who voted for it

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Donald Trump in November 2020. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images
  • Trump’s impeachment trial starts on Tuesday, but a report says his attention is already on payback.
  • An advisor told CNN Trump wants revenge on members of the House who voted for the trial.
  • Trump likely has broad enough GOP support to avoid being convicted by the Senate.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

As his impeachment trial looms, former President Donald Trump is fixated on getting revenge against Republican House members who voted to impeach him, CNN reported.

Trump’s second trial in the Senate starts Tuesday, after the Democratic-controlled House voted to impeach in January, charging him with inciting the insurrection at the US Capitol.

A Trump advisor told CNN that the former president’s new focus is getting back at the ten Republicans who voted with Democrats in the House to bring about the impeachment trial. No House Republicans supported his first impeachment.

CNN reported that Trump refers to the payback as “accountability” for what he views as “going against the people.”

Per the CNN report, the Trump advisor acknowledged that such a view was a “twisted” understanding of reality.

The House voted to impeach Trump after his supporters rioted in the Capitol after he addressed them in a speech where he repeated his false claims that he had won the presidential election and told them to go to the Capitol.

The riot, which started as lawmakers were voting to confirm President Joe Biden’s win in the presidential election, resulted in five deaths, including that of a US Capitol Police officer.

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Supporters of Donald Trump gather at the west entrance of the Capitol during a ‘Stop the Steal’ protest outside of the Capitol building in January. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith/File Photo

As Insider’s Sonam Sheth and Jake Lahut reported, Trump is unlikely to be convicted by the Senate, as he has high Republican support there.

Two-thirds of the Senate would need to vote to convict him, which means at least 17 Republicans would need to support it.

All but five Senate Republicans voted to declare the trial unconstitutional before it even began, suggesting that Trump is secure from conviction.

A source told CNN that Trump also believes he will be acquitted.