Trump was reportedly irate after Melania's TV aboard Air Force One was set to CNN

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump.
  • President Donald Trump grew upset after first lady Melania Trump’s TV aboard Air Force One was set to CNN during a recent overseas trip, The New York Times reported Tuesday.
  • The president and his advisers have a rule where each trip starts by tuning into Fox News, according to The Times.
  • An internal White House email described the incident as causing “a bit of a stir” and included a discussion about ordering additional TVs so the president and the first lady could watch in their separate hotel rooms when travelling, the report says.

President Donald Trump fumed during his recent European tour with first lady Melania Trump after staff members violated his rule and failed to change the TV channel to Fox News aboard Air Force One, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

White House staffers had Melania Trump’s TV set to CNN instead of Fox News, the report says.

The president and his advisers have a rule where each trip starts by tuning into Fox News, The Times reported, citing an email chain between officials in the White House Military Office and the White House Communications Agency.

The email described the incident as causing “a bit of a stir” aboard Air Force One, and in it the White House officials discussed ordering additional TVs so that the president and the first lady could watch in their separate hotel rooms when travelling, according to The Times.

The email concluded by noting that all TVs should be set to Fox News in the future, The Times reported.

Trump frequently rails against networks he considers biased against his presidency, and he has dubbed CNN “fake news CNN” in numerous speeches and tweets.

At a convention on Tuesday for the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Trump warned the audience not to “believe the crap you see from these people, the fake news.”

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