7 of Britain's most successful business bosses just revealed their secrets for making it big

Richard reed innocentRichard Reed/TwitterRichard Reed in New York on a trip.

Becoming a millionaire seems like an impossible feat for most of us but some of the successful people in Britain grew their wealth from scratch by building great companies.

The BBC talked to a number of famous British entrepreneurs, business leaders, and musicians as part of their “CEO Secrets” series and each delivered snappy pieces of advice about making it big.

From starting a multi-pound business whilst at university, to changing careers in your forties, these business leaders have had very varied experiences making it big.

Business Insider picked seven of the best ones to show you how it’s never too late to become a success.

Anya Hindmarch: Designer and businesswoman

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Hindmarch designs some of the most sought after bags in the world which has won her accolades and a net worth of £13.2 million ($US20 million).

She said: 'The advice I would give is, 'be yourself because the other places are taken.' Be original. Cash is king, do not run out of money. Just be brave.'

James Dyson: Inventor of the bagless vacuum cleaner

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Dyson is the inventor of the bagless vacuum cleaner and now has a net worth of £3.1 billion ($US4.8 billion).

His advice is learning from your mistakes: '50% of the decisions you make will be wrong -- learn from them.'

Ruth Rogers: Chef and co-founder of The River Cafe

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River Cafe co-founder Lady Rogers holds her MBE, which she received from Queen Elizabeth II, at Buckingham Palace, on June 02, 2010 in London, England.

Rogers is the chef and co-founder of the massively popular restaurant The River Cafe. She was awarded an MBE from the Queen in 2010.

The restaurant won a Michelin star and over one million River Cafe cookbooks have been sold.

'If you are starting a new business, it's crucial you choose the people you are going to work with, and then treat them well. You are going to be spending a lot of time with them', Rogers advised.

Tinie Tempah: Rapper

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Rapper and business mogul Tinie Tempah has a net worth of £3 million ($US4.5 million) from best selling albums such as 'Disc-Overy.'

However, he's also a keen businessman, and ventures have included partnering with high-end drink maker Veuve Clicquot to host champagne and DJ bar touring alfresco events.

His advice is 'network from an early age.'

Giles Dean: Fitness entrepreneur

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Dean started off as a barrister and only started his personal fitness business in his forties. He co-founded 1Rebel with James Balfour. It's a centre that delivers high-intensity group exercise classes on a pay-as-you basis.

He advises: 'Make sure you've got a belief that you will sacrifice everything for (the dream), and as soon as you've got that get on with it.'

Richard Reed: Co-founder of Innocent drinks

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Reed, the co-founder of Innocent, set up the smoothie drinks company with his two best friends from university.

They sold the company to Coca-Cola in 2013 for £320 million ($US485 million). Now each of them has a net worth of £50 million ($US76 million).

Reed said: 'The single most important thing in business is to go out there and give it a go. Get started, and good luck.'

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