Today's Winners And Losers On Wall Street

WINNERS OF THE DAY:

Guillaume Rambourg – the star portfolio manager of hedge fund Gartmore Group resigned from the hedge fund that (momentarily) ruined his reputation.

Spencer Greenberg, Jeremy Newton, Jonathan Sturges, and Alexander
Fleiss
– They were all featured in a huge WSJ story about their tiny $7 million quant fund, Rebellion Research, just because they’re barely over 20 years old. Now everyone who reads the C-section knows who they are.

Gregg Brockway – The former i-banker, now a multi-millionaire tech entreprenuer after having sold Hotwire to IAC for $650 million, just founded Tripit.

Jamie Dimon – Apparently everyone’s calling him just, “Jamie,” now. They’ve dropped the last name, like he’s Madonna.

Paul Tudor Jones – The hedge fund manager of Tudor was outed for spelling out his initials in three man-made islands off the Chesapeake Bay.

Pablo Calderini – Deutsche Bank’s head of equity proprietary trading continued the mass exodus of prop traders that are leaving DB to join hedge funds. He’s going to a hedge fund. Which one, we’re not sure.

Jeff Urwin and Kevin Willsey – They are the new co-heads of investment banking for U.S. and Canada for JPMorgan.

Jonathan Turnbull – The former head of Citigroup’s infrastructure i-banking group has been poached by Lazard to be managing director of their energy, power, and infrastructure group.

Alastair MaxwellGoldman Sachs poached the former Morgan Stanley head of energy investment banking in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. He’ll start in London in October.

All Equities Traders Looking For A New Job: Brevan Howard is hiring.

LOSERS OF THE DAY:

Spencer Greenberg, Jeremy Newton, Jonathan Sturges, and Alexander
Fleiss
– They were all featured in a huge WSJ story about their tiny $7 million quant fund, Rebellion Research, just because they’re barely over 20 years old. They make the list under both winners and losers because now everyone who reads the C-section knows who they are, for better or worse.

Stefan Ortseifen – The former German CEO of IKB Deutsche Industriebank officially became the first German exec to get in trouble for his actions during the crisis.

Credit Suisse Employees Working In Germany: Their offices were searched today to find out more info about some workers possibly hiding assets in a tax evasion scheme.

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