Three MORE Things Google+ Gets Right

Sunday’s piece on things that Google+ got right was a surprise hit, and sparked lots of intriguing discussion. So here are three more aspects of Google+ I forgot to include in the original article:

1. 18+ members only — That’s right, Google took the high road by declaring their social network essentially a Bieber-free zone (and hopefully a Twilight-reduced zone). This may limit growth early on, but I think in the long-term it’s a total win: older, more influential and affluent users will prefer the “grown-up” network to Facebook and other competing services. You have to be 18 to cast a vote in the United States; you should have to be 18 to +1 something as well! 

2. Smooth, commonsense re-sharing — Sharing content, and re-sharing others’ posts, is extremely slick in Google+. It promotes virality, while properly attributing the original creator. So long are the days of the awkward retweet. 

3. Invites actually work — When you send it, it goes out. No waiting hours for an invite to arrive in a friend’s inbox. This is a small point, but creating a good first impression with new users eager to share the Google+ “experience” with their network of friends is crucial. 

3b. Google execs taking an active role — Many Googlers are actually on Google+ and interacting with members of the public, answering their questions and incorporating feedback. This is great PR, and it’s just good business to interact with your customers. Facebook always had an authoritarian feel where, ironically, you didn’t see many of the faces behind the product. 

I’m sure I have missed a couple of other cool aspects of the service. Feel free to message me via my Google+ or comment here.

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