A new poll found that 76% of college students say they support impeachment inquiry into President Trump

ReutersStudents at the University of Northern Iowa protesting president Donald Trump.
  • A new poll conducted by Axios and College Reaction found an overwhelming amount of support for the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump among college students.
  • Students were asked the same question in May before House Democrats began their formal impeachment inquiry. Since then, support in the poll for the impeachment inquiry has increased significantly across political affiliations.
  • Ninety-seven per cent of Democrats polled said they favoured the impeachment inquiry. For independents and Republicans, the percentages supportive of the inquiry were 76% and 22% respectively.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Three-fourths of all college students say they support the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, according to a new Axios and College Reaction poll. Students who identified as Democrats supported the inquiry significantly more than Republicans, but the polling data suggests President Donald Trump’s recent snowballing of scandals may be starting to move the needle among college kids toward impeachment, regardless of party affiliation.


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The impeachment inquiry into Trump, explained in 60 seconds

The poll, conducted on October 8-10, asked 850 panelists who identified as students what they thought about the impeachment inquiry. Students were asked to answer the question, “Do you approve of Congress’s decision to start an impeachment inquiry into President Trump?” A near-unanimous 97% of students who identified as Democrats said they supported the impeachment inquiry into Trump. Seventy-six per cent of self-identified independents supported the inquiry, while 22% of Republican students also supported the measure.

Support for an impeachment inquiry among college students increased by 24 points since May

Axios and College Reaction asked college students the same set of questions regarding an impeachment inquiry in May. At that time, 71% of Democrats and 44% of independents said they supported the inquiry. Only 16% of Republican students agreed with the impeachment inquiry at the time. The significant increase in support, regardless of political affiliation, suggests recent news has played a key role in altering people’s opinion.

Donald trumpAlex Wong/Getty Images

Much has changed since the original poll was conducted. In early September, a whistleblower complaint filed by a US intelligence official accused Trump of using the “power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 US election,” during a July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. That report, along with a second whistleblower report, compelled Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to announce she would launch a formal impeachment inquiry against the president.

Other polls have shown support increasing for the impeachment inquiry and even for impeachment itself. A Fox News poll conducted on October 6-8 found that roughly half (just 51%) of Americans favoured Trump being impeached and removed from office. A Washington Post poll released last week found that 58% of respondents said they supported an impeachment inquiry.

Still, the White House has signalled it intends to fight back against formal proceedings. The White House’s legal counsel, Pat Cipollone, made this point clear in a letter sent to Pelosi last week in which he said the administration would refuse to cooperate.

“In order to fulfil his duties to the American people, the Constitution, the Executive Branch, and all future occupants of the Office of the Presidency, President Trump and his Administration cannot participate in your partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances,” the letter said.

Trump has publicly dismissed the impeachment inquiry as a “witch hunt” and on Tuesday accused Democrats of lacking transparency.

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