A designer fixed the most annoying things about hand dryers

No matter your height, bathroom hand dryers somehow always seem a little too short or a tad too tall. A Korean designer has designed a bathroom hand dryer that’s built for humans of all heights.

Hyunsu Park, a student at the Kookmin University Department of Industrial Design, won an award from the Industrial Designers Society of America for his air dryer, which features a circular air flow that radiates hot air upwards and downwards, so that people of varying heights, whether they’re children, adults with disabilities, or otherwise tall people who don’t want to bend down can get their hands dried.

Nowadays, hand dryers are often one of three designs. There’s the classic design where you push a circular button to have the dryer go on for about ten seconds, and a second design with a motion detector that’s becoming more commonplace. In fancier places, you might run into a Dyson Airblade, where the air is released in two different directions.

The design that Park has is similar — the air is just directed vertically instead. No more bending down or reaching upwards. This hand dryer’s built for virtually any height.

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