This is what Labor will likely do with the NBN if it gets elected

4K Netflix will be a reality. Photo: Supplied

Speaking at the CommsDay summit yesterday, shadow minister for communication Jason Clare said that he believes rolling out fibre to the distribution point is the way the NBN should head.

While Labor hasn’t officially announced its NBN policy for the upcoming election, Clare spoke strongly for the FTTdp rollout and against most other options.

“Fibre to the driveway provides download speeds that are up to 10 times faster than Malcolm Turnbull’s fibre to the node network,” he said.

“NBN Co has conceded that the cost of rolling out fibre to the pit out the front of your house is now almost the same cost as fibre to the node.

“Given this, if NBN Co can roll out fibre almost to your front door for almost the same cost as fibre to the node and give you much higher speeds — why aren’t they doing it?”

Currently a big part of the Coalition’s NBN policy is to introduce a fibre to the node technology, which sees fibre optics rolled out to your nearest internet node (think those big green boxes) leaving the older copper style to do the rest.

Theoretically you will be able to receive speeds using the current technology of up to 100Mbps, however the further away you are from the node, the worse the connection is. This where Labor and NBN analysts believe the problem is with FTTN technology.

Fibre to the distribution point on the other hand, would see a thinner fibre cable run to the street lead-in pit, joining the existing copper cable the home uses. This means the copper length is lower with higher, more consistent speeds as well as the added benefits of not needing to dig up your front yard and the ability to upgrade to full fibre if you want to.

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