This chart shows Australian graduates have the lowest chance of getting the job they want

University students celebrate graduation. Photo: Getty Images

It’s that time when year 12 exams finish up and the anxious wait begins as students await notification on their chosen university courses.

But there’s sobering news for those with the heart set on a particular line of study, thinking it will help land them their dream job. A survey of more than 4,000 graduates across 14 countries conducted by Instructure, a software-as-a-service (SaaS) company, suggests students need to choose wisely and Australian universities might need to lift their game.

The survey shows that 72% of current and former Australian students said they were satisfied with their tertiary education environment while 77% said they felt that “their tertiary education provided them with the experience needed for their careers.”

But the data also shows Australia is lagging the pack when it comes to graduates working in their chosen field.

Jared Stein, VP of Research and Education at Instructure told Business Insider that “in Australia, only 60% of former graduates reported working in their chosen field.”

“This suggests either graduates are struggling to make use of their higher education as they transition from school to career,” he said, adding that perhaps increased uncertainty is just a part of life these days.

If only 60% of graduates are working in their chosen field, then there is a breakdown in the linkage that drives course choice, post-grad opportunity, or both.

Stein suggested that perhaps Australian students and universities need to be a little more adaptive.

“One way to counter this may be for universities to prepare students to think outside of one career option, and to develop knowledge and skills that help them to learn independently and pro-actively in order to adapt,” he said.

Clearly though, something looks like it needs to be done.

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