If You Go To Stanford Or Are A VC In Silicon Valley You Need To Know This 20-Year-Old VC

Ernestine FuErnestine Fu was named the youngest venture capitalist in Silicon Valley by Forbes.

Photo: NextGen Journal

Ernestine Fu is a woman of incredible ambition.She’s just 20 years old, but she’s already a VC. She hasn’t even graduated from Stanford yet.

She also taught a class called “Entrepreneurship Through the Lens of Venture Capital.”

In the class, students listened to tech visionaries such as Evan Williams, co-founder of Twitter, and famed venture capitalist Bill Draper.

At the end of the semester, instead of a demo day, Fu invited venture capitalists to meet her students at the Stanford Faculty Club. 

We were on hand for the last day of class and got to talk to some of the budding entrepreneurs and the VCs.

Students presented their startup ideas to a room full of venture capitalists. Everyone had to write down their top three choices on the back of personalised cards.

Summit Partners managing director Harrison B. Miller filled out which startups he liked.

I liked a startup called Anjna, so I wrote it on the back of my card... after hearing Anjna's founder Vineet Singal give his pitch on-stage.

Stanford senior Singal believes in the power of technology. After all, a cell phone saved his life. He told us that he was taken hostage when he was 12-years-old when a terrorist attack occurred near his school.

Steve Vassallo of Foundation Capital (on the left) has a soft spot for young entrepreneurs.

After all, he started Steve's Snowblowing Service at age 13. And here's his card to prove it!

David Hornik, a general partner at August Capital, attended every class.

Bill Coleman is also one of the advisors for the course. He is the founder of BEA Systems, which sold to Oracle for $8.5 billion. He's is now a partner at Alsop Louie Partners, which is the firm Fu works for.

Standing in the middle is Tom Kosnik, a professor at Stanford Technology Ventures Program. He was the one who introduced us to Fu after we met him at a holiday party.

Noe Lazano, the associate dean of the Stanford School of Engineering, told us about the importance of a T-shaped engineer. That must be a Stanford thing...

Around 100 guests showed up. 1/3 professors at Stanford, 1/3 partners at VC firms, 1/3 seasoned entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and students at Stanford.

But how often does Fu get to unwind with her professors? Looks like they managed to tonight!

John Weyant shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. He's the guy on the left. He turned to us and joked... what's hot right now... you know more than me.

Keith Belling, the founder of PopChips, talked about his growing company. Then he had to jet.

Speaking of food, check out these Stanford cupcakes.

Fu saw us taking photos of the cupcakes, so she came over to organise them. She's such a perfectionist.

This is what a 20-year-old VC's life is really like.

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