10 Things That Still Annoy Me About The iPhone

sparrow for iphone 400

Photo: Dominique Leca, Sparrow

I’ve had the iPhone since 2008 and I love it.But, after spending every single day for four years with it, there are a few things that get on my nerves about the iPhone.

(I imagine this is what marriage will be like one day. A lot of love, but too much time together can get occasionally frustrating.)

As a way of venting, I’ve listed 10 things Apple needs to fix. They’re not major, but after fours years with the iPhone, they’re starting to add up.

Lack of customisation

My iPhone has a home screen with 16 app icons, and a dock of four icons. The second screen has 16 app icons, and the same dock of four icons. My third screen, well, you get the idea.

If I want to change the look of any of those screens, I'm out of luck. It can't be changed at all. Apple won't let me add shortcuts, widgets, or live wallpapers.

In addition to customisation there are no shortcuts.

There is no easy or quick way to switch on and off WiFi, Bluetooth, aeroplane mode, or the brightness.

This is frustrating when I need to quickly turn down the brightness or see which WiFi network I'm connected to.

Siri is pointless

Siri is a novelty, not a truly useful personal assistant. The other day I decided to ask Siri about the weather. I was on a good WiFi connection. I got no answer. Apple needs to make Siri work, and make it useful.

The Battery needs to be better

If you have an iPhone you know what this feels like to have to walk around with a charger everywhere you go.

If I use my phone lightly I can make it almost a full day but if I have to respond to a lot of emails or I want to take photos throughout the day I can kiss my battery goodbye.

Auto correct

The iPhone's dictionary isn't smart. It doesn't learn new words or phrases, and this is after having the 4S for almost a year and the 4 before that.

It's embarrassing when I try to tell someone, 'I'll be there in one sec' and the phone changes it to 'sex'. Or the always frustrating 'Yo' to 'To'.

Bad service in NYC and beyond

I'm on AT&T living in New York City. It's as bad as everyone says it is. It's partially AT&T's fault, but in my testing of Android phones I find AT&T works better than on the iPhone. And it's not just in New York City, even outside the city I find the iPhone's connection to be weak.

The back up process needs work

Wireless back up was a neat addition but backing up to the cloud takes forever.

Also, why isn't there a way for me to pull out specific portions of my back up? I've run across many people who have had a corrupted back ups and have to start from scratch when they restore.

Apple should implement a way for users to pick and choose exactly what portions of our phone back up. If I only care about my texts let me restore those.

Not being able to choose a different default browser

I use Google's Chrome browser on my desktop computer. I use it on my iPhone, too. But, it's an incomplete experience because Apple doesn't let me make Chrome the default browser. So, if I see a link in an email, tweet, or app, it will automatically open to Safari instead of Chrome.

The Mail app is weak

Apple still doesn't have real push email with Gmail. I have to do a work-around with Exchange that kills the battery.

Sparrow, the email app that Google bought, had some innovative features Apple should steal. For instance, I can look at just my unread messages, which helps me keep my inbox clean. It also supports Gmail's favoriting feature which is great.

I can't leave a group text message.

If someone includes me in a group text message I can't leave. There is no way to opt out, I just have to be subjected to the group thread until it quiets down. This could be a simple fix, I hope Apple considers including this in iOS 6.

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