Theresa May says reports of caged children under Trump immigration policy are 'deeply disturbing' and 'wrong'

BBC NewsUK Prime Minister Theresa May
  • Theresa May says footage of immigrant children being separated from parents at US-Mexico border are “deeply disturbing” and “wrong.”
  • More than 2,300 children have been taken from their parents at the border since April, when the Trump administration’ announced a “zero-tolerance” policy towards refugees.
  • “The pictures of children being held in what appear to be cages are deeply disturbing,” May told MPs. “This is wrong, this is not something we agree with, this is not the United Kingdom’s approach.”
  • The PM confirmed the UK will still welcome Donald Trump to the UK later this year as part of a planned visit.

LONDON – UK Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the Trump administration’s policy of separating child refugees from their parents on Wednesday, describing reports of such incidents as “deeply disturbing” and “wrong.”

“The pictures of children being held in what appear to be cages are deeply disturbing,” May told MPs during Prime Minister’s Questions.

“This is wrong, this is not something we agree with, this is not the United Kingdom’s approach.”

Since the White House announced a new “zero-tolerance” approach towards immigration in early May, US authorities have taken more than 2,300 children from their parents at the US border. The government has faced a storm of criticism over images of some of those children being kept in cages.

She confirmed that Donald Trump would still be welcomed to the UK as part of a planned visit later this year, and said she would raise her objections with the US President among a “range of issues.”

“We have a special and long-enduring relationship with the US, and I think it is right there are a range of issues that I will be discussing with President Trump […] when we welcome the President of the United States here in the United Kingdom,” she said.

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