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IT'S TIME: The most technologically literate, connected generation is about to enter the workforce

We’re on the brink of significant generational transition in the workforce, as the Baby Boomers (born 1946-64) who make up a quarter of today’s workforce and hold a lot of the leadership roles are reaching retirement age and will be just 8% of the workforce in a decade’s time.

At the other end of the spectrum, as the Baby Boomers are phasing out of the workplace, the most materially endowed, technologically literate, formally educated, globally connected generation to ever grace the planet enter the workforce – Generation Z.

Generation Z, born 1995-2009, make up 18% of our population, 9% of the workforce but in a decade’s time will make up 31% of the workforce.

Whilst they will spend 14,000 hours in face to face classes in their schooling and for a degree, they’ll spend 6 times this in the workforce – an estimated 84,000 hours. But what will the future of work look like?

Generation Z bring new approaches to work, problem solving, innovation and collaboration. They have been born into an era of unprecedented change – this will be reflected in their approach to their careers. Today’s annual turnover rate is 15% per annum which equates to people staying in their roles for approximately 3 years 4 months. Projected over the lifetime of a school leaver today it is estimated they will have 17 jobs across 5 careers in their lifetime.

Social trends transforming the future of work.

The Intergenerational Report by the Australian Government outlines three major social trends which will transform the future of work as we know it- population, participation and productivity.

Population

Australia’s population is growing at 1.4% per annum, and we will reach 24 million people by the end of 2015. We have doubled both our national and our global population since 1966.

However our population is not only growing but also ageing. Our population pyramids visually communicate our growth – in 1985 it was a pyramid as there were more younger people than older people, however today it is becoming more rectangular and demonstrates how we are on the brink of massive ageing. As we project to 2045 our population pyramid will start to become inverted as we will have more people aged over 60 than under 18 for the first time.

There are not only more older people but we are living longer than ever before, having added 10 years of life expectancy in the last four decades.

Our population is also changing, and we are more culturally diverse than ever before with 58% of Australia’s growth attributed to net overseas migration. We are increasingly generationally diverse with six generations represented in our communities today.

Participation

In the years ahead we will see the female workplace participation rate continue to increase. And we will be working later in life with the retirement age being pushed back. Even so, because of the impact of the aging population our workforce participation rate will actually decline, with today’s participation rate at 65.1% projected to decline to 62.4% in 2055.

The ratio of Australians in the workplace to retirees is also radically changing. In 1975, there were 15 people of working age (aged 15-64) for every couple of retirement age (aged 65+). Today there are just 9 people of working age for every couple of retirement age, and by 2055 it is projected to be just 5.4 people of traditional working age for every couple of retirement age.

Productivity

Due to the declining ratio of people of working age to those in retirement, there is going to be a greater need for productivity from the labour force. The workforce of the future will need to do more with less. This final defining social trend, productivity, is the only one not based on demographic realities.

The Intergenerational Report outlines that for every hour an Australian works today, twice as many goods and services are produced as they were in the early 1970s. One of the contributors to this is technology which has enabled greater efficiencies.

The future of work.

It is not just technology which has increased productivity outcomes over the years. Productivity is maximised by people and organisations who can innovate, and communities who can collaborate. Effectiveness, innovation, productivity comes when it is in the hands of people who can see solutions, generate ideas, solve problems and facilitate innovations.

Technology, innovation and collaboration.

Sectors have been transformed where there’s the intersection of technologies with innovation and collaboration.

For example, AirBnB has challenged the traditional approach to accommodation solutions. Their innovative approach to accommodation has been released to the collaborative power of the community to become accommodation providers, and has been leveraged through the technology platforms.

Similarly, the network transportation company Uber has transformed the approach to transportation. Launched internationally in 2012, Uber is in 58 countries, worth an estimated $50 billion yet doesn’t own one car. An innovative approach, released to the collaborative community, leveraged through technology.

Cancer Research UK provides another creative example of this. They created a computer game ‘Play to Cure: Genes in Space’. By playing it you analyse significant amounts of genetic data which would have taken scientists hours to do and can help beat cancer sooner. Leveraging technologies, fostering innovation and embracing collaboration.

Effective leaders of the future.

The effective leaders of the future will not be those necessarily with the most developed skill set but those who can effectively create a culture of collaborative innovation.

Traditional leadership models have been based on position, hierarchy, command and control. Whilst leadership remains essential, the styles of leadership the emerging generations respond best to are those that foster a context for them to connect, create and contribute.

A workplace culture of collaborative innovation is inclusive of a multicultural, multigenerational, multigifted community – it draws on the strengths of the diversity through positioning people in contexts which foster growth, innovation and collaboration.

Creating a culture of collaborative innovation.

A culture of collaborative innovation requires focusing on the people not just the process. On shaping a team not just spending on technologies. It requires building on a foundation of shared values such as humility, respect and honesty. It’s where leaders create autonomy supported inclusive multigenerational workplaces.

Productivity and outcomes are important. Essential in fact. But perhaps as we shift our focus from process to people, from transactional to transformation leadership, and create vibrant, healthy, dynamic workplace communities – the productivity, innovation and output is likely to be greater than ever and flow simply as by-product – of people investing the 84,000 hours of their working lives in a rewarding way and in a thriving culture of collaborative innovation.

Claire Madden is a TedX speaker, social commentator, futurist and Director of Research at McCrindle, a market and social research company. This article was orginally publish by McCrindle. See the original article here.

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