There are 166,000 job vacancies in Australia right now -- here's who's hiring and where

Photo: Mike Hewitt/ Getty Images.

If you’re looking for a job in Australia, we have some good news for you. Job vacancies are rising.

The government’s Internet Vacancy Index (IVI), a report published by the Department of Employment, rose by 2.8% to 165,578 in April after seasonal adjustments, leaving the level of vacancies up 6.0% from 12 months earlier.

Adding to optimistic headline figure, the increase in vacancies was broad-based, whether measured by state and territory or industry.

Aside from the Northern Territory which saw vacancies drop 0.5%, all other states and territories recorded an increase in positions advertised, led by an enormous 8.8% gain in Tasmania.

From a year earlier, and reflective of the divergent economic performance across the nation, the largest increases came from the ACT and New South Wales which rose by more than 13% apiece. Tasmania, courtesy of the enormous gain in April, took out third spot with vacancies increasing 9.5%.

At the other end of the spectrum, Western Australia and the Northern Territory — those regions most exposed to the fortunes of the mining sector — recorded annual declines of 12.8% and 1.8% respectively.

Bettering on the geographic performance, vacancies increased in all eight occupation groups in April, led by a 7.1% jump in available sales positions. Openings for clerical and administrative workers, machinery operators and drivers, and labourers also saw increases of more than 5%.

Compared to a year earlier, vacancies rose in all groups aside from those in community and personal services.

The table below, supplied by the Department of Employment, breaks down the change in vacancy levels by industry and location.

And for those who prefer to look at colourful infographics, this nifty map reveals where vacancies have increased, and where they’ve fallen, over the past 12 months.

The IVI survey is based on a count of online job advertisements newly lodged on SEEK, CareerOne and Australian JobSearch during the month, with duplicate advertisements removed to ensure greater accuracy.

Though the vast majority of job postings are now placed online, the survey does not capture all available vacancies nationwide that originate from sources such as employer websites, word of mouth and newspapers. The department also stresses that it does not take account multiple positions being advertised for a single job vacancy.

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