WSJ Reporter Who Resigned Over Flirty Emails Gives Her Side Of The Story

Gina Chon

Photo: WSJ

Gina Chon, the former Wall Street Journal reporter that’s been in the public spotlight in the last week due to the leak of a series of flirty and racy emails she exchanged with Brett McGurk, a former Bush administration advisor and President Obama’s nominee for the ambassador to Iraq position, is finally giving her side of the story behind the exchange.In an email to friends and colleagues that was obtained by BuzzFeed, Chon said the publicized emails made her feel “so vulnerable, so targeted and so exposed.” She and McGurk are now married.

Chon, who met McGurk when she was a Baghdad correspondent for the WSJ, was a reporter for the Money & Investing section when she resigned earlier this week. She said in the email: “The venom of Washington politics makes Wall Street, which I covered for the last two years, look like a playground.”

More from the email:

But underneath the half-truths and outright lies is a fairly simple tale of two people who met in Baghdad, fell in love, got engaged and later married. In the process we formed a strong connection with Iraq, a place where we lost many friends.

I’m not trying to absolve myself of responsibility. People were hurt along the way and for that, I am truly sorry. I made stupid mistakes four years ago in Iraq while working for the Wall Street Journal and for that, I’m also sorry. I had to leave my job at a news organisation I love and for that, I am heartbroken.

Read the entire mail Chon sent to her friends >

See how it all unfolded: A WSJ Money & Investing Reporter Exchanged Racy Emails With Obama’s Nominee For Ambassador To Iraq

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