The work of the one-armed Australian bricklaying robot now has council approval

The robot bricklayer. Image: Supplied.

A house built using the same bricks and adhesive system used by a one-armed bricklaying robot developed in Australia has received local government and engineering approval.

Fastbrick Robotics, in a quarterly report to the ASX, says the Perth house was built by Archistruct Builders & Designers using a proprietary system and materials used by the Hadrian X, the next generation bricklaying robot.

“The house was built using traditional manual bricklaying methods, and received engineering and council approval, demonstrating that the materials the Hadrian X will use are compliant with existing regulatory requirements,” the company said.

The bricks used have interlocking perpendicular joints which means adhesive only needs to be applied on the top and bottom of the brick. This also increases the thermal efficiency of the house and the strength of the structure.

Perth-based builder Archistruct Builders & Designers has a deal with Fastbricks to build the world’s first 3D printed brick homes using the Hadrian X commercial prototype bricklaying robot.

The builders have the right to construct an initial 10 homes.

The Hadrian X commercial prototype now being built will be able to do in an hour what would take two human bricklayers almost a day to complete.

Here’s an animation of the robot in action:

The truck-mounted, fully-automated bricklaying machine can lay up to 1,000 standard bricks an hour from a 30 metre boom.

“We actually print a house, layer by layer … almost as if it’s growing out of the ground,” says Fastbrick chief technical officer Mark Pivac.

The Perth-based company listed on the ASX in November in a reverse takeover of DMY Capital. An oversubscribed IPO raised $5.75 million at 2 cents a share.

The shares are currently trading at 12.5 cents.

The prototype Hadrian 105 robot, the first of its kind, can be seen in action below:

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