The Titanic museum’s iceberg wall collapsed, injuring 3 visitors

The exterior of the Titanic Museum Attraction at Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.
The exterior of the Titanic Museum Attraction at Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Titanic Museum Attraction website
  • An iceberg exhibit wall collapsed at the Titanic Museum Attraction in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.
  • Three people were hospitalized; the extent of their injuries was not immediately known.
  • The museum owners said the wall will likely take four weeks to rebuild.
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The iceberg exhibit wall at the Titanic Museum in Tennessee collapsed on Monday, injuring three people.

Authorities in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, responded to a call Monday at 8 p.m. local time “to find that a wall of ice display fell and injured several visitors,” according to an update Tuesday.

Guests receive boarding passes with names of actual passengers and crew members who were aboard the doomed ship, and the attraction includes interactive exhibits where they can feel frigid 28-degree water and touch “a real iceberg,” according to the museum’s website.

The Pigeon Forge Police Department said the collapse appears to be an accident. The names of the victims were not released nor were details regarding the extent of the injuries they sustained.

In a statement released after the accident on Monday, Titanic Museum owners Mary Kellogg Joslyn and John Joslyn said they “never would have expected an incident like this to occur.”

“We take pride in the quality of our maintenance and have measures in place to ensure that appropriate safety guidelines are upheld,” they continued.

The museum remained closed Monday night and reopened Tuesday to guests. The Joslyns said the iceberg wall “does not currently exist, and the affected area has been blocked off, for the time being.”

“We anticipate it will take at least four weeks for the iceberg to rebuild,” the owners said in a statement on Tuesday, adding, “Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with all who were affected, including the first-responders.”