The one-armed robot bricklayer is getting its own advisory committee

Image: Fastbrick

Fastbrick Robotics, the maker of the one-armed robot bricklayer, announced the formation of an advisory committee to help the company expand and launch a commercial version of its automated home builder.

The first member of the advisory committee is construction expert Curtis Rodgers, the Principal Vice President at Brick & Mortar Ventures, a San Francisco-based venture capital firm founded by Darren Bechtel, a member of the family which founded the Bechtel Corporation.

“It is my honour to join Fastbrick’s team as the first member of its advisory Committee,” says Rodgers.

“Fastbrick is a revolutionary robotics company with global opportunities. I am excited about the Company’s prospects and expect my deep understanding of the dynamics of the global construction industry, new technologies and construction will be an asset to the Company.”

Mike Pivac, Fastbrick’s CEO, says the launch of an advisory committee is an important milestone for Fastbrick.

“The guidance provided by the committee will include the identification, analysis and management of opportunities and risks and the full range of commercial, political, legal and other issues,” he says.

“These factors will have a material influence on Fastbrick’s ability to successfully realise its vision of revolutionising construction and generating shareholder value from the Company’s Intellectual Property portfolio.”

The commercial bricklaying robot is expected to cost about $2 million when it goes into full production in 2019.

The machine requires minimal human interaction and works day and night, laying up to 1,000 bricks an hour — about the output of two human bricklayers for a day.

The prototype Hadrian 105 robot, the first of its kind, can be seen in action below:

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