The NBN pulled a new ad promoting its fast speeds after it revealed something that had everyone talking

A screenshot from the now deleted video. Image courtesy of Kotaku.

The NBN celebrated the halfway mark in its $50 billion roll out this week with charts and a new video on its successes.

But it wasn’t long before eagle-eyed internet users spotted something in the video that got them talking – a section featuring an internet speed test which included a “ping” rate of 598 milliseconds.

A ping is a measure of the time it takes for two devices to get in touch with each other. Ideally, that figure show be as close to zero as possible, or at least in single digits. At 598, it’s more than double human reaction time. The seemingly slow speed had many in the tech community talking

Alex Walker at Kotaku noticed and wrote about it, which led the NBN to respond pointing out that it was a test for Sky Muster satellite connection and it was “exceptional service… in global terms” and standard for satellite broadband customers.

And tellingly, while the media section still has a link through to “video resource” it now ends up at “This video has been removed by the user”.

The message to the video link on the NBN site. Screenshot

Meanwhile, Kotaku’s Alex Walker has revealed that any concerns over the ping issue may not be the reason it was withdrawn.

The ad is back up with one change to that part of the clip.

The original featured an IP address in the bottom left and on satellite services, they’re static, meaning that was basically the home address for someone’s computer.

An NBN spokesperson told Business Insider:

An error was identified in the clip post-publication. As soon as we became aware of the error, nbn took immediate steps and can confirm the IP address used in the original clip is not active.

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