The Most Interesting Things We Learned From Steve Jobs' FBI File

laurene powell jobs and steve jobs

Photo: Diana Walker / Contour by Getty Images

Steve Jobs was a visionary — but did you know he wasn’t a communist?That’s just one of a few interesting (though possibly already obvious) tidbits uncovered in a 1991 FBI background check on Steve Jobs.

At the time, he was appointed to be a member of the president’s export council. There are dozens of interviews in the report.

We’ve gone through them and picked out some of the most interesting pieces of information.

Nearly everyone interviewed considered Jobs a good man and recommended him for the position.

He lived a spartan lifestyle.

Naturally, there were some questions about his use of drugs...

...but a huge number of people in the report said they knew nothing about his drug use.

He seemed to be a good neighbour, too. He approached a neighbour about landscaping.

At one point, he rented out an apartment but never lived there because he spent the whole time renovating it.

He wasn't related to any communists.

He wasn't a communist and wasn't planning on overthrowing the U.S. government, either.

But even in his early days, Jobs had a reality distortion field.

Jobs was also deceptive at times, according to some of the interviews.

That wouldn't stop him from serving with the government, though.

He alienated former colleagues at Apple because of his ambition.

He belonged to the New York Athletic Club, but had never been to it before. He also traveled to the Soviet Union and Japan a lot.

At the time, he had never been fired from any job other than at Apple.

One woman he hired away from ACI was unable to find a position at NeXT that suited her.

Chrisann Brennan, Jobs' former girlfriend, appears to have obscured her name to protect her daughter Lisa from being kidnapped for ransom.

Jobs' former girlfriend, Chris Ann Brennan, appears to have refused to interview with the FBI

Jobs was the sole owner of all of Pixar's stock, and was the only member of the company's board of directors.

At one point, Jobs was the victim of a bomb threat at Apple.

Jobs appeared to have not taken the threat seriously and dismissed the caller completely.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.