The 10 most important things in the world right now

Good morning! Here’s what you need to know on Wednesday.

1. Canada’s new Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau pledged to transform the country’s policy on climate change after it became the first nation, under defeated Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper, to pull out of the landmark Kyoto Protocol in 2011 and was labelled a “climate laggard” by the United Nations.

2. A new video shows hundreds of refugees breaking through a Croatian checkpoint on the Serbian border, with some police actually helping migrants to cross over.

3. Japanese exports grew by 0.6% in September from a year earlier, the weakest growth since August 2014.

4. US
Vice President Joe Biden, preparing for a possible presidential bid, says he supported the raid that killed former al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, a change from previous accounts.

5. A 33-year-old New York City police officer died after being shot in the head while responding to a report of a man armed with a gun in Manhattan’s East Harlem neighbourhood.

6.
The Texas teenager arrested for taking a homemade clock is moving to
Qatar after getting a full scholarship to study there.

7. Ferrari has reportedly priced its IPO at $US52 (£33.66), valuing the Italian automaker at $US9.82 billion (£6.36 billion).

8. Sony will pay former and current employees $US8 million (£5.1 million) in a settlement related to the hack of its computers last year, in order to cover identity-theft losses, the cost of credit-fraud protection services, and legal fees.

9. An ex-Fukushima worker in his 40s is the first confirmed person to have developed cancer from radiation exposure.

10. Advance ticket sales for the new Star Wars film crushed first day records, beating “The Hunger Gamer,” two months before the movie’s December 18 opening.

And finally …

The Orionids meteor shower, which is generated by the famous Halley’s Comet, will be visible in the early morning hours.

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