The 10 most important things in the world right now

1. Google is reoganising under a new parent company called Alphabet of which Larry Page will be the CEO.

2. Ferguson, Missouri, declared a state of emergency on Monday to prevent more violence after police shot a man during a one-year anniversary march to mark the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white officer.

3. Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor since the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

4. China on Tuesday devalued its currency, the yuan, weakening it by nearly 2% from Monday’s level in a “one-off depreciation.”

5. Russian-backed rebels on Monday reportedly carried out the heaviest attacks against the Ukraine military since a ceasefire deal in February.

6. Greece and its European creditors entered a marathon session of overnight talks to work out the final details of a bailout deal, which would then need to be approved by Greece’s parliament.

7. Turkey was hit by a series of attacks on Monday that left at least eight people dead, events that follow increased tensions with Kurdish and far-left militants.

8. Australia has pledged to reduce carbon emissions by 26-28% from 2005 levels by 2030, a less ambitious target compared to other developed countries.

9. Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world’s longest serving monarch, was treated for “water on the brain,” according to a rare statement from the palace since the 87-year-old king was admitted to the hospital in May.

10. Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway paid $US37.2 billion (£23.8 billion) for aircraft components maker Precision Castparts, its biggest deals ever.

And finally …

“Fantastic Four,” now in theatres, is getting slaughtered by fans and critics for lacking action.

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