Tour An Extraordinary Floating Cabin In The Wilds Of British Columbia

Float cabin

Photo: YouTube / Fair Companies

Years ago, Wayne and Margy Lutz paid $30,000 for a tiny float cabin in the wilds of British Columbia.  “It cost about the same as taking a fancy cruise,” says Margy, who figured the investment would offer a stress-free retirement compared to their home in LA.

She was right: The couple have lived off-grid for years, and relish every moment spent on their scenic but modest-sized property. 

“Living in a 675 square foot cabin with water access only is a bit unique,” she told Fair Companies in a video, but for me and Wayne it’s perfect.”

The cabins are constructed from large, buoyant cedar wood logs. The Lutz's log float was originally a helicopter landing pad.

It's nearly impossible to build anything on the steep granite walls, and the logs tend to float away, taking the homes with them.

To solve the problem, the homes are built with a pulley system so they can be moved or kept in place.

Margy always wanted a garden, but clearly there were some obstacles. She made a floating garden instead by laying out cedar wood logs, then building a deck and four raised beds on top. Today she grows asparagus, carrots and tomatoes, among other vegetables.

The couple uses propane gas for cooking, and get their water from a hand pump which draws directly from the lake. Here, Margy shows how it works.

This year, the Lutzs replaced their outhouse with an eco-friendly composting toilet. This is the bin. A scoop of mulch goes into the toilet after use, then the materials compost. A solar-powered fan clears away any odor.

At the top of a cliff—and four flights of stairs—you'll find Margy's potato patch. A double-barrel watering system and tarp collect rain water, which is then used to water the potatoes via a garden hose.

Wayne whiles his days writing and reading, but says he rarely goes online. He prefers the laid-back vibe of the wilderness, and being away from city distractions.

Now meet another person living cheap in the wilds of Canada ...

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